Singapore

Interesting LGBT items out of Singapore….

From ILGA State-Sponsored Homophobia Report, 2013
From ILGA State-Sponsored Homophobia Report, 2013

February 2014: The Singapore Health Promotion Board, which is the island nation’s leading government health organization, has declared that LGBT citizens are NOT mentally ill and are NOT suffering from any disease. They are instead — surprise — normal. And, to emphasize that, the Health Promotion Board has posted what is, for Singapore, an extraordinarily LGBT-positive online “FAQs on Sexuality.” Click to read it.   However, a petition against the Health Promotion Board’s information has been started by the anti-LGBT pastor of a Singapore megachurch, Faith Baptist.  According to Gay Star News, Health Minister Gan Kim Yong was expected to address the issue Feb. 17 after MP Lim Biow Chuan told the media  he disagrees with the health’s board’s  views on homosexuality.

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From the U.S. State Department Human Rights Report 2012:

The constitution states that all persons are equal before the law and entitled to the equal protection of the law, and the government generally respected these provisions in practice; there is no explicit provision granting equal rights to women and minorities. Mindful of the country’s history of intercommunal tension, the government took numerous measures to ensure racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural nondiscrimination. Social, economic, and cultural benefits and facilities were available to all citizens regardless of race, religion, or gender.

Societal Abuses, Discrimination, and Acts of Violence Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

After failure of a 2007 attempt to repeal the section of the penal code (377a) that criminalizes sex between men, Prime Minister Lee stated that the authorities would not actively enforce the statute.

In November a gay couple filed a challenge to Section 377a. This was the second challenge to the constitutionality of the law.

In 2010 Tan Eng Hong was arrested for engaging in sex acts in a public space. He and another man were charged under Section 377a for committing “an act of gross indecency with another male person.” After Tan challenged the constitutionality of the provision, the prosecution substituted the charge with Section 294a, committing an obscene act in a public place. The two men pleaded guilty to the new charge and were each fined S$3,000 ($2,459). The Attorney General’s Office closed Tan’s constitutional challenge. Tan’s appeal to the High Court was denied. Subsequently, Tan appealed to the Court of Appeal, and in August the court agreed that the case should be heard in the High Court.

In June more than 15,000 persons participated in the annual Pink Dot event to demonstrate support for inclusiveness, diversity, and the “freedom to love.”

The MDA continued to censor films and television shows with LGBT themes. According to the MDA Web site, the broadcast of LGBT themes on television is allowed “as long as the presentation does not justify, promote, or glamorize such a lifestyle.”

From the U.S. State Department Human Rights Reports, 2010

Societal Abuses, Discrimination, and Acts of Violence Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

After failure of a 2007 attempt to repeal the section of the penal code criminalizing sex between men, Prime Minister Lee stated that the authorities would not actively enforce the statute, leaving gay men free to live their private lives in peace as long as they did not actively promote their sexual orientation.

During the year two men were arrested for a homosexual act in a public toilet and charged under laws that provide for a jail term of up to three months, or fine, or both. One of the men was convicted and fined S$3,000 ($2,300). At year’s end the other man remained out on bail awaiting trial.

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